Radiator evaluation installation

Radiator is a well behaved Perl application, and installation is usually easy, but you will need to be prepared to spend some time configuring Radiator to suit your needs. You will need to be a competent system administrator in order to install Radiator.

You will need to have a basic understanding of RADIUS and your system's authentication and accounting requirements in order to configure Radiator. You will need to have a basic understanding of SQL in order to configure AuthBy SQL (if you plan to use it). You will need to have a basic understanding of LDAP in order to configure AuthBy LDAP (if you plan to use it).

Unix and non-RPM Linux systems

Your system very likely has Perl and most of the required Perl modules installed or readily packaged for installation. If a required module is not already packaged, you need to install it from CPAN. If you need to install from CPAN, try the latest available version first.
  1. Make sure you are (or have access to) a system administrator and someone who understands your Radius authentication and accounting requirements.
  2. Obtain and install Perl 5 version 5.8.8 or better.
  3. Obtain and install Perl Digest-MD5 and Perl Digest-SHA
  4. This installation method requires ExtUtils-MakeMaker which is part of Perl. Some recent Linux distributions, such as RHEL 6, may not have ExtUtils-MakeMaker installed by default but it can be installed with something like yum install perl-ExtUtils-MakeMaker
  5. If you plan to use SQL for authentication and/or accounting, obtain and install DBI and the DBD module for your selected database. DBD modules are available for many commercial, free and other RDBMSs
  6. If you plan to use MS-CHAP or MS-CHAP2 authentication, obtain and install Digest-MD4
  7. If you plan to use LDAP for authentication and/or accounting, obtain and install perl-ldap
  8. If you plan to use EAP TLS, TTLS or PEAP for 802.1x authentication, obtain and install OpenSSL, Net-SSLeay and Digest-HMAC
  9. If you plan to use the GUI interface to radpwtst, obtain and install Perl Tk (version Tk800.002 or better)
  10. Unpack the distribution with gunzip -c Radiator-Locked-x.x.tgz|tar xvf -
  11. Check the latest patches and bug alerts for patches that might be relevant to your installation.
  12. Change to the distribution directory: cd Radiator-Locked-x.x
  13. perl Makefile.PL
  14. make test This is the regression test. You should see lots of lines saying "ok" and none saying "not ok".
  15. As a final test, run Radiator with a simple configuration file:
    • Run radiator with perl radiusd -config_file goodies/simple.cfg. This runs Radiator with logging turned on (so you can see whats happening), and authenticates all requests from the file users. You will see some messages, followed by "NOTICE: Server started:". Radiator is now waiting for requests to arrive.
    • In another window, change to your Radiator directory, and run the test application with:
      perl radpwtst -user fred -password fred
      You should see "OK".
    • Rerun radpwtst, this time with the wrong password from fred:
      perl radpwtst -user fred -password wrong
      You should see "Rejected".
    • If you configure a test NAS to use this server, you will able to log in as the user "mikem" with password "fred".
  16. If all goes well, make install. This will install the Radius perl modules in your site-perl directory, and radiusd, radpwtst, builddbm and buildsql in your local executable directory.
  17. Now go to Configuration

Linux RPM

Linux users can easily install from an RPM binary package. The minimum prerequisite is Perl Digest-SHA module which is part of core Perl since Perl 5.10.0. On RHEL 6 and 7 it is packaged separately and can be installed with yum. On RHEL 5 you need to install it from CPAN.

  1. Make sure you are (or have access to) a system administrator and someone who understands your Radius authentication and accounting requirements.
  2. Log in as root
  3. Check that Digest-SHA is installed. Install it on RHEL 6 and 7 with yum install perl-Digest-SHA
  4. Check that Digest-MD5 is installed. Install it on RHEL 7 with yum install perl-Digest-MD5
  5. Install the package with rpm -Uvh Radiator-Locked-x.x-x.noarch.rpm
  6. Start the server /etc/init.d/radiator start
  7. Test authentication radpwtst
  8. Edit /etc/radiator/radius.cfg to suit your site and needs. See the reference manual in /usr/share/doc/packages/Radiator-Locked-x.x for more details.
  9. Now go to Configuration

Mac OS X

We recommend installing Xcode and a Perl installation management tool, such as Perlbrew which can be used to install, for example, cpanm to obtain modules from CPAN. This allows you to start working with Radiator without modifying the Perl installation that comes with OS X.

Perl that comes with OS X works with Radiator, but may not have all the modules your configuration might require.

Solaris

On Solaris, we recommend install from the tarball as described above. Previous Radiator versions were packaged for Solaris, but required Perl from Sunfreeware (http://www.sunfreeware.com) to find the correct installation locations. We now recommend to install Perl from your preferred source and then use the Radiator tar package for Radiator installation.

Windows installation

On Microsoft Windows, we recommend that you use ActivePerl from ActiveState, or Strawberry Perl. See the respective links for more about support and other options these Perl distributions provide. Both ActivePerl and Strawberry Perl install very easily and have many additional precompiled modules available.

Windows installation with ActivePerl

  1. Download and install ActivePerl ActiveState
    During installation, we recommend installing it in C:\Perl64. This is typically the default for the MSI package.
  2. Connect your computer to the Internet so you will be able download any required Perl modules from ActiveState using PPM.
  3. Open a Command Prompt window. Install some prerequisite Perl modules. If a module is already installed, the command will tell you so.
    cd \
    ppm install Win32::Daemon
    ppm install Digest::HMAC
    ppm install Digest::MD4
  4. If you plan to use SQL authentication, find the database specific DBD module(s) by typing ppm search DBD. For example to install DBD::ODBC, type ppm install DBD::ODBC
  5. If you plan to use LDAP for authentication and/or accounting, obtain and install Net::LDAP by typing: ppm install Net::LDAP
  6. If you plan to use EAP TLS, TTLS or PEAP for 802.1x authentication obtain and install Net::SSLeay by typing: ppm install Net::SSLeay
  7. Download Radiator Zip file from Radiator downloads Opens in new window. Let it unpack to the default location, C:\Radiator. When using the default location, Radiator distribution will be in C:\Radiator\Radiator-Locked-x.yy where x.yy is the version number.
  8. Start a command window with administrator access, change directories to the distribution directory.
  9. Type perl Makefile.PL. This will check that your distribution is complete.
  10. Run the regression tests with perl test.pl. You should see lots of lines like "ok xx", and none saying "not ok xx".
  11. Install Radiator with perl Makefile.PL install. This will install the Radiator programs and libraries in the standard places, and will create a basic Radiator configuration file in C:\Program Files\Radiator\radius.cfg and a sample users file in C:\Program Files\Radiator\users.
  12. Run radiator to test the sample configuration with perl c:\perl64\bin\radiusd. You will see some messages, followed by "NOTICE: Server started:". Radiator is now waiting for RADIUS requests to arrive.
  13. In another command window run the test client program with perl c:\perl64\bin\radpwtst -user mikem -password fred. You should see "OK" for all requests. This proves that Radiator has correctly authenticated the user mikem, whose login details are in the users file in C:\Program Files\Radiator\users.
  14. Rerun radpwtst, this time with the wrong password for mikem: perl c:\perl64\bin\radpwtst -user mikem -password wrong. You should see "Rejected:" for Access-Request.
  15. If you configure a test NAS to use this server, you will able to log in as the user "mikem" with password "fred".
  16. To optionally arrange for Radiator to be run as a service automatically at boot time, see the Radiator Reference Manual
  17. Now go to Configuration

Windows installation with Strawberry Perl

  1. Download and install Strawberry Perl from StrawberryPerl website
    During installation, we recommend installing it in C:\Strawberry. This is typically the default for the MSI package.
  2. Connect your computer to the Internet so you will be able download any required Perl modules from CPAN
  3. Open a Command Prompt window. Install some prerequisite Perl modules. If a module is already installed, the command will tell you so.
    cd \
    cpan Win32::Daemon
    cpan Digest::HMAC
    cpan Digest::MD4
  4. If you plan to use SQL authentication, find the database specific DBD module(s) from CPAN. For example to install DBD::ODBC, type: cpan DBD::ODBC
  5. If you plan to use LDAP for authentication and/or accounting, obtain and install Net::LDAP by typing: cpan Net::LDAP
  6. If you plan to use EAP TLS, TTLS or PEAP for 802.1x authentication obtain and install Net::SSLeay by typing: cpan Net::SSLeay
  7. Download Radiator Zip file from Radiator downloads Opens in new window. Let it unpack to the default location, C:\Radiator. When using the default location, Radiator distribution will be in C:\Radiator\Radiator-Locked-x.yy where x.yy is the version number.
  8. Start a command window with administrator access, change directories to the distribution directory.
  9. Type perl Makefile.PL. This will check that your distribution is complete.
  10. Run the regression tests with perl test.pl. You should see lots of lines like "ok xx", and none saying "not ok xx".
  11. Install Radiator with perl Makefile.PL install. This will install the Radiator programs and libraries in the standard places, and will create a basic Radiator configuration file in C:\Program Files\Radiator\radius.cfg and a sample users file in C:\Program Files\Radiator\users.
  12. Run radiator to test the sample configuration with perl c:\strawberry\perl\bin\radiusd. You will see some messages, followed by "NOTICE: Server started:". Radiator is now waiting for RADIUS requests to arrive.
  13. In another command window run the test client program with perl c:\strawberry\perl\bin\radpwtst -user mikem -password fred. You should see "OK" for all requests. This proves that Radiator has correctly authenticated the user mikem, whose login details are in the users file in C:\Program Files\Radiator\users.
  14. Rerun radpwtst, this time with the wrong password for mikem: perl c:\strawberry\perl\bin\radpwtst -user mikem -password wrong. You should see "Rejected:" for Access-Request.
  15. If you configure a test NAS to use this server, you will able to log in as the user "mikem" with password "fred".
  16. To optionally arrange for Radiator to be run as a service automatically at boot time, see the Radiator Reference Manual
  17. Now go to Configuration

Configuration

Now that Radiator is installed and you know that it is working properly, you need to configure it to suit your own local needs. Radiator uses a configuration file to tell it important things like which NASs it will talk to, and how to handle authentication and accounting requests from those NASs. Radiator has a large number of ways to handle authorisation and accounting. You will have to create a configuration file for your site. Because your needs will almost certainly be different from anyone else, you will need to spend some time building and testing it.

  1. Read the configuration reference manual
  2. Check the example configuration files in the goodies directory. You might find one that suits your needs very closely.
  3. Create and edit a configuration file. We suggest you start with a very simple config file such as the the one in goodies/radius.cfg. Add extra features as you go.
  4. Run radiusd by hand, and test it with radpwtst until you are sure it is configured the way you need for your site. You may want to specify your config file with -config_file filename.
  5. When you are sure Radiator is configured the way you want, arrange for radiusd to start automatically at boot time (see the reference manual for details of different ways to do this for different platforms)
  6. Join the Radiator Free Mailing List. This will allow you to exchange help and information with other Radiator owners.

Additional Resources

If you have trouble

If you have an Email support contract send any questions to the relevant email support contract address, quoting your Email Support User Name. Otherwise, you may use the Radiator Free Mailing List

Before you post to the email support address or free mailing list asking for assistance, we suggest you go through the following check list:

  1. If you have trouble downloading the software, please contact info@open.com.au.
  2. Consult the Reference Manual.
  3. Consult the FAQ for extra hints.
  4. Check that you are using the latest version of Radiator. See downloads, use the username and password we have issued to you. Upgrade if you need to.
  5. Check whether there are any patches that address your problem. See the README in the patches directory for your revision. Apply any patches that you think you might need.
  6. If you still have the problem post to the free mailing list by mailing to radiator@lists.open.com.au (you will need to subscribe before first posting to that list) Be sure to include at least the following information:
    • A detailed description of the problem.
    • Your Radiator configuration file (remove any secrets and passwords first).
    • An extract from your Radiator log file (with Trace level of 4) illustrating the problem, or at least what is happening at the time of the problem.
    • Details of the computer type, operating system etc.
    This information helps people to understand your problem and help find a solution more quickly. If you have a support contract, you may email us at radius-support@open.com.au. Mail to this address will be ignored unless you have a support contract.